March 2010
(Jan. Data)

The Joint Economic Committee released a report entitled “Understanding the Economy: State-by-State Snapshots,”  which provides easy access to the major economic indicators in all 50 states and the District of Columbia in the areas of jobs, unemployment, personal earnings and housing.

Key economic statistics for each state include:

•    Jobs created or lost since the start of the recession;
•    Jobs saved or created by the Recovery Act;
•    Unemployment rates;
•    Per capita earnings; and,
•    The condition of the housing sector.

To view your state's snapshot report, click on the below links:

•    AlabamaSBS - March 2010 Cover
•    Alaska
•    Arizona
•    Arkansas
•    California
•    Colorado
•    Connecticut
•    Delaware
•    District of Columbia
•    Florida
•    Georgia
•    Hawaii
•    Idaho
•    Illinois
•    Indiana
•    Iowa
•    Kansas
•    Kentucky
•    Louisiana
•    Maine
•    Maryland
•    Massachusetts
•    Michigan
•    Minnesota
•    Mississippi
•    Missouri
•    Montana
•    Nebraska
•    Nevada
•    New Hampshire
•    New Jersey
•    New Mexico
•    New York
•    North Carolina
•    North Dakota
•    Ohio
•    Oklahoma
•    Oregon
•    Pennsylvania
•    Rhode Island
•    South Carolina
•    South Dakota
•    Tennessee
•    Texas
•    Utah
•    Vermont
•    Virginia
•    Washington
•    West Virginia
•    Wisconsin
•    Wyoming

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 The Joint Economic Committee, established under the Employment Act of 1946, was created by Congress to review economic conditions and to analyze the effectiveness of economic policy.

Joint Economic Committee Releases New Report on
Long-Term Unemployment in the African American Community

Washington, D.C. – A new report released today by the Joint Economic Committee (JEC) provides an in-depth look at unemployment and long-term unemployment among African Americans and shows that both the unemployment rate and the duration of unemployment increased dramatically during the Great Recession for African American workers.

“Understanding the Economy: Long-Term Unemployment in the African American Community” is the first in a series of JEC reports examining the unemployment situation among several demographic groups, including African Americans, Hispanics, youth, and women.  Prepared by the JEC’s Majority staff, the report draws from previously unpublished data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and found that though African Americans make up 11.5 percent of the labor force, they account for 17.8 percent of the unemployed, 20.3 percent of those unemployed for more than six months, and 22.1 percent of the workers unemployed for a year or more (see chart below). 

Other key report findings include:

  • From February 2007 to February 2010, unemployment among African American men more than doubled, climbing from 9.0 percent to19.0 percent.  Among African American women, unemployment increased from 7.1 percent to 13.1 percent during the same time period.     
  • The median duration of unemployment for African American workers also has doubled, increasing from less than three months before the recession began to almost six months in February 2010.  Forty-five percent of unemployed African Americans have been out of work for six months or more.
  • Younger African American workers have faced particularly high rates of unemployment.  In February 2010, more than two out of five African American teenagers were unemployed, compared to an overall teen unemployment rate of slightly over 25 percent.

“Our first report in the JEC’s in-depth series on long-term unemployment shows that African Americans have been hit especially hard during the Great Recession, facing higher rates of unemployment and longer spells of unemployment than the overall population,” said Chair of the Joint Economic Committee (JEC) Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney.  “By better understanding the unemployment challenges facing specific communities, Congress can design and enact innovative policies that effectively address these challenges and help people get back to work.  This new report will help move us down that path.”

“Every day in the neighborhoods around my home, I see the signs that this recession has been particularly hard in my community,” said Congressman Elijah Cummings (MD-7), member of both the Joint Economic Committee and the Congressional Black Caucus. “This report puts into numbers what has been obvious, from the beginning. The so-called Great Recession has been absolutely crushing for the African American community. The work the JEC has done to highlight the incredibly high long-term unemployment rate among African American workers is very important, and it will be particularly useful to the Congressional Black Caucus as we continue the fight for policies that will address this issue that is so critical in our communities.”

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 The Joint Economic Committee, established under the Employment Act of 1946, was created by Congress to review economic conditions and to analyze the effectiveness of economic policy.

The report analyzes the demographics of workers who currently have access to paid sick leave and workers who would gain access to paid sick leave under the Healthy Families Act.

January 2010 (based of December Data)

The Joint Economic Committee released a report entitled “Understanding the Economy: State-by-State Snapshots,” (Part 2) which provides easy access to the major economic indicators in all 50 states and the District of Columbia in the areas of jobs, unemployment, personal earnings and housing.

Key economic statistics for each state include:

•    Jobs created or lost since the start of the recession;
•    Jobs saved or created by the Recovery Act;
•    Unemployment rates;
•    Per capita earnings; and,
•    The condition of the housing sector.

To view your state's snapshot report, click on the below links:

•    AlabamaReport Cover
•    Alaska
•    Arizona
•    Arkansas
•    California
•    Colorado
•    Connecticut
•    Delaware
•    District of Columbia
•    Florida
•    Georgia
•    Hawaii
•    Idaho
•    Illinois
•    Indiana
•    Iowa
•    Kansas
•    Kentucky
•    Louisiana
•    Maine
•    Maryland
•    Massachusetts
•    Michigan
•    Minnesota
•    Mississippi
•    Missouri
•    Montana
•    Nebraska
•    Nevada
•    New Hampshire
•    New Jersey
•    New Mexico
•    New York
•    North Carolina
•    North Dakota
•    Ohio
•    Oklahoma
•    Oregon
•    Pennsylvania
•    Rhode Island
•    South Carolina
•    South Dakota
•    Tennessee
•    Texas
•    Utah
•    Vermont
•    Virginia
•    Washington
•    West Virginia
•    Wisconsin
•    Wyoming

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 The Joint Economic Committee, established under the Employment Act of 1946, was created by Congress to review economic conditions and to analyze the effectiveness of economic policy.

Report of the Joint Economic Committee Congress of the United States on the 2009 Economic Report of the President Together With Minority Views

The status-quo health insurance system is serving women poorly. An estimated 64 million women lack adequate health insurance. Over half of all medical bankruptcies are filed by female-headed households. For too many women and their families today, quality, affordable health care is out of reach.

Women are more vulnerable to high health care costs than men. Several factors explain why.  First, women’s health needs differ from men’s, so women are obliged to interact more regularly with the health care system – regardless of whether they have adequate insurance coverage or not. Second, women are more likely to be economically vulnerable and therefore face devastating consequences when faced with a mounting pile of medical bills. The inability of the current system to adequately serve women’s health care needs has come at great expense. One recent study estimates that women’s chronic disease conditions cost hundreds of billions of dollars...

American families are experiencing very difficult economic times – the toughest in terms of stagnant incomes since World War II.  Over the 2000-2008 period, the economic policies pursued during the previous administration left most families behind and ill-prepared to weather the severity of the current recession.  During the Bush administration, the number of Americans living in poverty  increased by nearly 8.2 million; and instead of growing, incomes for families in the bottom 40 percent of the income distribution ladder actually fell. One out of every eight Americans was living below the federal poverty line in 2008. Also, during the eight years of the Bush administration, the ranks of the uninsured grew by 20.6 percent. The cost of health insurance has risen steadily, putting pressure on employers and straining cash-strapped American families.
In the nineteen months between December 2007 and July 2009, the economy shed 6.7 million jobs, the national unemployment rate spiked 4.5 percentage points to 9.4 percent, and the unemployment rate rose in every state and the District of Columbia.  In July, 8 states posted statistically significant over-the-month increases in their jobless rates while 2 states (Minnesota and Vermont) posted statistically significant over-the-month decreases in their jobless rates. Although unemployment rates in the remaining states were essentially unchanged in July, workers across the country continue to experience distressed levels of unemployment. In July, the unemployment rate was 10.0 percent or higher in 15 states and the District of Columbia, and 3 states (Michigan, Rhode Island, and Nevada) had unemployment rates of 12.0 percent or higher.

Working women have received pink slips in growing numbers over the course of the current recession, which began in December 2007.  For the first 3 months of the recession, when job losses were relatively light, women actually gained rather than lost jobs. This uptick in women’s employment is similar to what has happened in previous recessions.  However, in August 2008, this recession began to look quite different from past downturns. Women’s job losses picked up pace to become a significant fraction of the total monthly job losses.

As women’s job losses have accelerated, so have the job losses for working mothers. A Joint Economic Committee analysis of published and unpublished data collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) finds that increases in unemployment during this recession have been especially steep for female heads of household – mothers who are solely responsible for maintaining their families’ economic security.