The legalization of cannabis has significant implications for state economies, as well as the national economy. The industry totaled more than $8 billion in sales in 2017, with sales estimated to reach $11 billion this year and $23 billion by 2022. There were more than 9,000 active licenses for cannabis businesses in the U.S. in 2017, with the industry employing more than 120,000 people.
For millions of Americans, the promise of owning a home remains a cornerstone of the American Dream. Homeownership provides an avenue for accumulating wealth, promotes financial security, and plays a critical role in the development of family and community life. Yet, nearly a decade since the Great Recession ended, owning a home remains out of reach for many millennials (defined as those roughly between the ages of 22 and 37).
Although the U.S. economy overall continues its expansion following the Great Recession and associated financial crisis, the recovery can look very different from state to state. The lion’s share of economic gains are not only concentrated at the top of the income and wealth distribution, but also in a small share of regions. While some parts of the country have surged ahead, millions of Americans in urban and rural communities are still waiting for their wages to start rising again and struggling to make ends meet.
Joint Economic Committee Democrats today released a report that outlines the threat of climate change to the economy following the recent National Climate Assessment report. The report states that the increase in frequency and severity of extreme weather events continue to place the American economy at risk by threatening household wealth and property and upending insurance markets. The Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond projects that climate change could reduce annual economic growth in the United States by one-third over the next century. The report calls for immediate action to mitigate the economic damages of climate change.
Although the U.S. economy overall continues its expansion following the Great Recession and associated financial crisis, the recovery can look very different from state to state. The lion’s share of economic gains are not only concentrated at the top of the income and wealth distribution, but also in a small share of regions. While some parts of the country have surged ahead, millions of Americans in urban and rural communities are still waiting for their wages to start rising again and struggling to make ends meet.