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Joint Economic Committee Democrats Chairman - Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA)

Reports & Issue Briefs

Increasing oil prices could threaten the country’s economic recovery and limit progress on energy-efficiency policies, according to a new report issued by the Joint Economic Committee (JEC) today on the eve of Earth Day’s 40th anniversary.

The report, titled Rising Oil Prices:  A Potential Threat to Economic Recovery and Energy-Efficiency Policies,” shows that the United States, which has made little progress towards reducing its dependence on oil for transportation, remains vulnerable to oil price spikes.   The share of U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) going to oil expenditures has more than doubled from 1.8 percent in 1993 to 3.8 percent today and is close to the 4 percent level – a level often associated with recessions.  The reliance on oil to meet the country’s transportation needs also harms the environment: the transportation sector has been the largest producer of carbon dioxide since 1999, producing almost one-third of total CO2 emissions in the United States.

An Equal Pay Day report released by the Joint Economic Committee shows that the pay gap between part-time and full-time workers is a key factor driving the continued pay gap between men and women.

The report titled, “The Earnings Penalty for Part-Time Work: An Obstacle to Equal Pay,” shows that part-time workers earn significantly less than their full-time counterparts and that women make up close to two-thirds of part-time workers.

 

April 2010 (based on March Data)

The Joint Economic Committee released a report entitled Understanding the Economy: State-by-State Snapshots,” which provides easy access to the major economic indicators in all 50 states and the District of Columbia in the areas of jobs, unemployment, personal earnings and housing.

Key economic statistics for each state include:

•    Jobs created or lost since the start of the recession;
•    Jobs saved or created by the Recovery Act;
•    Unemployment rates;
•    Per capita earnings; and,
•    The condition of the housing sector.

To view your state's snapshot report, click on the below links:

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 The Joint Economic Committee, established under the Employment Act of 1946, was created by Congress to review economic conditions and to analyze the effectiveness of economic policy.

March 2010 (based of February Data)

The Joint Economic Committee released a report entitled Understanding the Economy: State-by-State Snapshots, which provides easy access to the major economic indicators in all 50 states and the District of Columbia in the areas of jobs, unemployment, personal earnings and housing.

Key economic statistics for each state include:

•    Jobs created or lost since the start of the recession;
•    Jobs saved or created by the Recovery Act;
•    Unemployment rates;
•    Per capita earnings; and,
•    The condition of the housing sector.

To view your state's snapshot report, click on the below links:

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 The Joint Economic Committee, established under the Employment Act of 1946, was created by Congress to review economic conditions and to analyze the effectiveness of economic policy.


March 2010
(Jan. Data)

The Joint Economic Committee released a report entitled “Understanding the Economy: State-by-State Snapshots,”  which provides easy access to the major economic indicators in all 50 states and the District of Columbia in the areas of jobs, unemployment, personal earnings and housing.

Key economic statistics for each state include:

•    Jobs created or lost since the start of the recession;
•    Jobs saved or created by the Recovery Act;
•    Unemployment rates;
•    Per capita earnings; and,
•    The condition of the housing sector.

To view your state's snapshot report, click on the below links:

•    AlabamaSBS - March 2010 Cover
•    Alaska
•    Arizona
•    Arkansas
•    California
•    Colorado
•    Connecticut
•    Delaware
•    District of Columbia
•    Florida
•    Georgia
•    Hawaii
•    Idaho
•    Illinois
•    Indiana
•    Iowa
•    Kansas
•    Kentucky
•    Louisiana
•    Maine
•    Maryland
•    Massachusetts
•    Michigan
•    Minnesota
•    Mississippi
•    Missouri
•    Montana
•    Nebraska
•    Nevada
•    New Hampshire
•    New Jersey
•    New Mexico
•    New York
•    North Carolina
•    North Dakota
•    Ohio
•    Oklahoma
•    Oregon
•    Pennsylvania
•    Rhode Island
•    South Carolina
•    South Dakota
•    Tennessee
•    Texas
•    Utah
•    Vermont
•    Virginia
•    Washington
•    West Virginia
•    Wisconsin
•    Wyoming

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 The Joint Economic Committee, established under the Employment Act of 1946, was created by Congress to review economic conditions and to analyze the effectiveness of economic policy.

Joint Economic Committee Releases New Report on
Long-Term Unemployment in the African American Community

Washington, D.C. – A new report released today by the Joint Economic Committee (JEC) provides an in-depth look at unemployment and long-term unemployment among African Americans and shows that both the unemployment rate and the duration of unemployment increased dramatically during the Great Recession for African American workers.

“Understanding the Economy: Long-Term Unemployment in the African American Community” is the first in a series of JEC reports examining the unemployment situation among several demographic groups, including African Americans, Hispanics, youth, and women.  Prepared by the JEC’s Majority staff, the report draws from previously unpublished data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and found that though African Americans make up 11.5 percent of the labor force, they account for 17.8 percent of the unemployed, 20.3 percent of those unemployed for more than six months, and 22.1 percent of the workers unemployed for a year or more (see chart below). 

Other key report findings include:

  • From February 2007 to February 2010, unemployment among African American men more than doubled, climbing from 9.0 percent to19.0 percent.  Among African American women, unemployment increased from 7.1 percent to 13.1 percent during the same time period.     
  • The median duration of unemployment for African American workers also has doubled, increasing from less than three months before the recession began to almost six months in February 2010.  Forty-five percent of unemployed African Americans have been out of work for six months or more.
  • Younger African American workers have faced particularly high rates of unemployment.  In February 2010, more than two out of five African American teenagers were unemployed, compared to an overall teen unemployment rate of slightly over 25 percent.

“Our first report in the JEC’s in-depth series on long-term unemployment shows that African Americans have been hit especially hard during the Great Recession, facing higher rates of unemployment and longer spells of unemployment than the overall population,” said Chair of the Joint Economic Committee (JEC) Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney.  “By better understanding the unemployment challenges facing specific communities, Congress can design and enact innovative policies that effectively address these challenges and help people get back to work.  This new report will help move us down that path.”

“Every day in the neighborhoods around my home, I see the signs that this recession has been particularly hard in my community,” said Congressman Elijah Cummings (MD-7), member of both the Joint Economic Committee and the Congressional Black Caucus. “This report puts into numbers what has been obvious, from the beginning. The so-called Great Recession has been absolutely crushing for the African American community. The work the JEC has done to highlight the incredibly high long-term unemployment rate among African American workers is very important, and it will be particularly useful to the Congressional Black Caucus as we continue the fight for policies that will address this issue that is so critical in our communities.”

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 The Joint Economic Committee, established under the Employment Act of 1946, was created by Congress to review economic conditions and to analyze the effectiveness of economic policy.

The report analyzes the demographics of workers who currently have access to paid sick leave and workers who would gain access to paid sick leave under the Healthy Families Act.